Amy Barger (b. 1971) is an astronomer whose research
focuses on black holes, quasars and other very distant objects. She is a
professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

She obtained her PhD
from King’s College, University of Cambridge, in 1997, and started researching
the formation and morphology of distant galaxies. She has won numerous prizes
in recognition of her work, such as the Annie J. Cannon Award or the Pierce
Prize of the American Astronomical Society.

Ingeborg Hochmair (b. 1953) is an electrical engineer from Austria.
She helped create the first micro-electronic multi-channel cochlear implant in
1977.

She was the first
woman to obtain a PhD with distinction in electrical engineering from the Technical
University of Vienna. She co-founded the medical device company MED-EL in the
eighties, and so helped create the modern hearing aid.

Sana Iqbal (1987-2017) was a cross-country biker from
India. After surviving a suicidal episode, she dedicated her life to suicide
prevention and mental health.

Her famous cross-country
trip through India was completed over 6.5 months and 38000 km. On the way, she
gave 135 seminars and workshops under the awareness campaign “Suicide is not
the solution”. She died tragically in a car accident at the age of 30.

Sylvia Lawler (1922-1966) was a researcher in the field of human genetics. Her
research focused on leukaemia and trophoblastic disease.

She
was part of the first ever department for the study of human genetics, founded
at University College, London. She became the first female professor at the
Institute for Cancer Research in 1980. She later established the first national
fetal tissue bank in the UK.

Indira Nath (b. 1939) is an immunologist and pathologist from India. Her research focuses
on reaction and nerve damage in leprosy, as well as immune unresponsiveness.

She
specialised in immunology and worked for the Royal College of Surgeons and the
National Institute for Medical Research in London. Her research contributed
greatly to advancements in the understanding and treatment of leprosy.

Winnie Byanyima (b. 1959) is an aeronautical engineer and
politician from Uganda. She was the executive director of Oxfam International
from 2013 to 2019.

She graduated from the
University of Manchester with a degree in aeronautical engineering, becoming
the first Ugandan woman to do so. She worked for Ugandan Airlines and later
became a Member of Parliament. In 2006 she became the director of the Gender
Team in the Bureau for Development Policy at the United Nations Development
Programme.

Fiona Caldicott (b. 1941) was the first woman to serve as President
of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in the UK, as well as its first female
Dean. She was also the Principal of Somerville College at Oxford University.

In 2014, she became
the first National Data Guardian for Health and Social Care in the country,
responsible for patient-identifying information within the NHS. She served as
the President of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

Wanda Wiłkomirska (1929-2018) was a Polish violinist and teacher. She is best known for
her performances of 20th century music and for promoting Polish
music outside national borders.

She
studied music in Warsaw and Budapest and started winning international prizes
as a teenager. From 1999 onwards, she taught at the Sydney Conservatorium of
Music and also worked for the Australian National Academy of Music.

Marlene Sanders (1931-2015) was a news correspondent and anchor who worked for ABC and
CBS News. She was the first female anchor of an evening news broadcast on a
major network.

She
started working a low-level job in television in 1955, but progressed through
the ranks until she became the first woman to report on the Vietnam War from the
field, and later the first female vice president of ABC News. She produced
documentaries for CBS news, especially on women’s movements, and won three Emmys
for this work.

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942) was a famous art collector and patron. She
founded the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City in 1931.

She
was an artist in her own right, starting a career as a sculptor in Paris. Her
first publicly presented work was Aspiration in 1901. Her work can now
be admired in public spaces around New York City, San Francisco and Washington,
D.C., among others.