Category: politics

Begum Khaleda Zia (b. 1945) served as the Prim…

Begum
Khaleda Zia
(b. 1945) served as the Prime Minister of Bangladesh for two terms,
1991-1996 and again 2001-2006. She was the first female head of a democratic
government in her country, and the second in a Muslim-majority country.

During her time as Prime Minister, the GDP
of Bangladesh increased considerably, and the country opened to international
investment. Her government also worked to alleviate poverty and support female
education.

Jacinda Ardern (b. 1980) is currently the Prim…

Jacinda Ardern (b. 1980) is
currently the Prime Minister of New Zealand. Assuming the position in 2017, at
the age of 37, she became the youngest female head of government in the world.

She is also a Member of Parliament
and the Leader of the Labour Party. Progressive on issues such as women’s rights
and LGBT rights, she was the first Prime Minister of the country to march in a
gay pride parade.

I’M BACK

Okay so after like a 2 year absence I am back on this blog!

Not really sure what direction I’m gonna go in so please message/comment with what type is posts you want to see more of, here are my usual post categories:

– straight up feminism
– men’s rights (but nice positive ones that talk about rights in a feminism context)
– posts about lbgtq rights (and all variants of the term)
– political posts about gender equality

Also keep an eye out for an exciting re-vamp of the whole blog 🙌

Christine Quinn (b. 1966) is a Democratic poli…

Christine Quinn (b. 1966) is a Democratic politician who served as Speaker of the New York City Council. She was the first woman and first openly gay person in this position.

As part of the New York City Council, she sponsored the Equal Benefits Bill and the Health Care Security Act. All throughout her political career, she championed LGBT rights and urged the state Senate to legalise same-sex marriage. She became the president and CEO of Women in Need in 2015.

Angela Merkel (b. 1954) has been the Chancello…

Angela Merkel (b. 1954) has been
the Chancellor of Germany since 2005. She has been described as the most
powerful woman in the world, the leader of the Free World, and the de facto leader of the European Union.

She has a doctoral degree in
quantum chemistry from Leipzig University, and worked as a research scientist
before getting into politics. She served as President of the European Council
and is currently the senior G7 leader.

satisfying

satisfying

Yvonne B. Miller (1934-2012) was the first Afr…

Yvonne B. Miller (1934-2012) was the
first African-American woman to be elected to the State House of Virginia. She
achieved this in 1983 as a member of the Democratic Party.

She was elected for her first term
in the State Senate in 1987, again the first African-American woman to do so.
She was consistently re-elected until the time of her death, when she was the
longest-serving woman in the Senate.

Ana María Romero de Campero (1941-2010) was a …

Ana María Romero de Campero (1941-2010) was a
Bolivian politician and human rights activist. She was the first Defensor del Pueblo (Human Rights
Ombudswoman) in the country.

She was the first female president
of the Association of Journalists, and later became President of the National
Press Association. At the time of her death she was the President of the
Bolivian Senate.

Samia Nkrumah (b. 1960) is the chairperson of …

Samia Nkrumah (b. 1960) is the
chairperson of the Convention People’s Party in Ghana. She is the first woman
in the country to head a major political party.

She studied at the University of
London before returning to Ghana to head the CCP and continue its tradition of
upholding women’s rights in the country. She co-founded the organisation Africa Must Unite and was named ‘the new
Mandela’ by the Huffington Post.

Evangelina Estrada Kalaw (1920-2017) served as…

Evangelina Estrada Kalaw (1920-2017)
served as a state senator in the Philippines during Ferdinand Marcos. She was
one of the main opponents of the authoritarian ruler and was instrumental in
his eventual downfall.

She taught at several universities in the
country, and was involved with numerous civic and social organisations such as
the League of Women Voters or the Youth Welfare Council. She was one of the few
brave enough to criticize the administration, and was imprisoned and even
attacked with hand grenades as a result. Her efforts were recognised with the
Mahatma Gandhi Freedom Award in 1985.