Category: women in stem

Black female physicist pioneers technology tha…

Black female physicist pioneers technology that kills cancer cells with lasers:

This is from 2016 and clearly old news but I didn’t know about this so I thought why not share? It’s nice to see good news from time to time!

Betty Holberton (1917-2001) was one of the six…

Betty
Holberton
(1917-2001)
was one of the six female programmers who worked on the ENIAC, the first
general-purpose electronic digital computer. She first worked as one of many women
‘computors’, hired during World War II because of the shortage of men.

She worked for the Moore
School of Engineering, and later for the National Bureau of Standards and the
Navy’s Applied Math Lab. Her awards include the Augusta Ada Lovelace Award and
the IEEE Computer Pioneer Award.

Bonnie Dunbar (b. 1949) is a retired NASA astr…

Bonnie Dunbar (b. 1949) is a retired
NASA astronaut and a current professor of aerospace engineering at Texas A&M University. She is also the
Director of the Institute for Engineering Education and Innovation.

She became an astronaut in 1981 and logged
more than 1200 hours in space. She later served as the president and CEO of the
Museum of Flight, and was the head of the STEM Center at the University of Houston.

Thelma Estrin (1924-2014) was a pioneer in the…

Thelma Estrin
(1924-2014) was a
pioneer in the fields of biomedical engineering and expert systems. She was one
of the first scientists to apply computer technology to medical research.

She studied electrical
engineering and obtained her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in
1951. She then worked for the Neurological Institute of New York, and later for
the Brain Research Institute at UCLA, where she organised a Data Processing
Laboratory. She was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship and the IEEE Centennial
Medal, among other honours.

The barefoot engineers of Malawi – in pictures

The barefoot engineers of Malawi – in pictures: undefined

Clelia Giacobini (1931-2010) was an Italian sc…

Clelia
Giacobini
(1931-2010)
was an Italian scientist. She was a pioneer of microbiology applied to conservation
and restoration.

She obtained her PhD
from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France, and went on to work in the
laboratory of Microbiology at ICR Rome. Her work was instrumental in uncovering
the microbial types responsible for alterations of archaeological and
architectural monuments. This helped ensure the proper restoration and
conversation of numerous historical sites throughout Rome and the world.

Kathryn S. McKinley (b. 1962) is a computer sc…

Kathryn S.
McKinley
(b.
1962) is a computer scientist whose research focuses on runtime systems,
compilers and computer architecture. She worked for Microsoft as Principal
Researcher and is currently a Senior Research Scientist for Google.

She studied computer science and engineering
at Rice University, and later taught at other institutions such as the
University of Massachusetts Amherst and the University of Texas at Austin. She
has won numerous awards for her work from the Association for Computing Machinery,
such as the Distinguished Scientist and the Test of Time Award.

Helen Dodson Prince (1905-2002) was an astrono…

Helen Dodson Prince (1905-2002) was an astronomer working for a number of prestigious institutions such as Wellesley College or MIT’s Radiation laboratory. Her pioneering research focused on solar flares.
She obtained her PhD in astronomy from the University of Michigan in 1934, where she later became a professor. She also served as the associate director of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory. In 1954 she received the Annie Jump Cannon Award in Astronomy for her contributions to the study of solar flares.

Pardis Sabeti (b. 1975) is a biologist and gen…

Pardis Sabeti
(b. 1975) is a
biologist and geneticist from Iran. She has had a fruitful scientific career
which includes developing a bioinformatics statistical method and an algorithm
to identify the effect of genetics on the evolution of disease.

She studied at MIT,
Oxford and Harvard, and later became a postdoctoral fellow at the Broad
Institute. She won numerous awards for her research, such as the Packard
Foundation award in Science and Engineering or the American Ingenuity Award
from Smithsonian magazine.

Caroline Hussey (1941-2017) was a microbiologi…

Caroline
Hussey
(1941-2017)
was a microbiologist and academic from Ireland. She was the first female Deputy
President and Registrar of University College Dublin.

She studied at University College and Trinity
College Dublin, earning a PhD in Microbiology. She became the chairwoman of the
National Council for Curriculum and Assessment in 1996, making her one of the
most influential persons in Irish education.